’Twas the week before Christmas

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Few on the left really doubted the fact that a Johnson government would be bad. I hoped, and still think, that on some big issues (Brexit and Scotland) Johnson will surprise (delivering a softish Brexit and independence) because both, pragmatically, will assist his grip on power, which is what always matters most to any Tory prime minister. But there are signs it will be grim along the way.

Electoral reform is going to happen. Photo ID will be demanded. Many do not have it. The Labour vote is likely to be hit hardest, although I can also see this being a problem amongst the aged, and I suspect some easy registration option for those on pensions to be provided to prevent the Tory base collapsing in that part of society, which is vital to them.

Boundary reform will happen. 

The Supreme Court will no longer be supreme: we will have government without accountability.

Arbitrary powers for ministers in the EU Withdrawal Act will become the new standard mechanism of government without parliamentary approval as a result.

Workers rights have departed that Bill.

The promise of an increase in the minimum wage, made until

December 12 has disappeared, in effect.

Brexit is going to happen. And risk of it being hard has increased, albeit I still don’t think it likely.

 To add to the risk of that, Trump effectively guaranteed the reflective demise of WTO trade rules.

We know Whitehall departments are under threat: chaos and centralised control is the planned order of the day. 

There is no prospect right now of a real Green New Deal.

And Labour is worrying about a new leader with few of those on offer having the apparent qualities required for the job. Effective opposition is some way off, I fear.

That was the week before Christmas. And for a good many fear pervaded, for very good reason. 

This has the prospect of being as ugly as I thought.