Second, they come for that part of the electorate who might not like their views

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I note this in the Guardian this morning:

When Carrie Paechter, a professor at Nottingham Trent University, tweeted two weeks ago that students could register to vote at both their home and term-time addresses, she didn’t anticipate the tirade of anger it would unleash. She was reported to the police and the Electoral Commission, and someone wrote to her vice-chancellor calling for her to be disciplined.

Prof Paechter, who is director of Nottingham Centre for Children, Young People and Families, posted what she thought was an innocuous tweet on a Thursday evening. By Sunday she had blocked 568 people on Twitter who were furiously accusing her of encouraging students to break the law and vote twice. She insists she had no such intention, and simply wanted to ensure students didn’t miss out on voting in the general election, because they didn’t know their rights.

I would suggest that the response is coordinated, deliberate and an attempt to discourage students from voting at all - especially as the election is on near enough the last day of this term.

I'd also suggest that students are more than capable of realising that they can only vote once.

In that case I think this is part of the deliberate far-right attempt to undermine democracy that is now rampant. Second, they come for that part of the electorate who might not like their views.