Never has so much been decided by so few in a state of such ignorance with consequence for so many

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It is extraordinary that less than three weeks before we are supposed to leave the EU we do not know if we will, and on what terms. 

It is perhaps even more extraordinary that whatever deal is being discussed is not known to us.

And nor, come to that, were the actual terms of the proposal most recently made, but now very obviously consigned to history, published in full.

What are we meant to think?

How are we meant to make up our minds?

Let alone, how are we meant to provide informed consent for what might happen to the country we live in? 

The one thing that is certain is that whatever we voted upon in June 2016 provides no mandate for what might happen now, for the very obvious reason that we could not have known then what is happening at present.

And when will we be told?

And how?

And in what detail?

The government is spending millions upon millions to tell us that we might be leaving, although that is not certain.

And many more millions are being expended advising business of the new administrative burdens that they will face that might cost £15 billion a year for no net gain to the country.

But on why this is happening, for what purpose, to what end, other than to fulfil the supposed demand of the referendum, almost nothing is said.

And there is, of course, good reason for that. It is that no one knows.

Just as no one knows what the deal might be. Indeed,  from moment to moment the government probably has very little idea of what, precisely, is being negotiated, or not, with little better clue as to whether it will ever be endorsed by the Tory party’s MPs, the DUP or the House of Commons as a whole.

We are in the dark as to why we are doing Brexit, when it will happen, with what consequence, and for whom. And let’s not presume that someone, somewhere actually knows the answers to all these questions. Barring the only available justification, which is that on a day a tiny majority of those who voted gave a majority for negotiation to proceed, no one in any position of authority or influence who seeks to justify this action appears to have any clue as to why we are leaving the EU. And none can with any confidence answer any of the other points I raise in any rational way.

Never, then, has so much been decided by so few in a state of such ignorance with consequence for so many.

In the annals of political history this will be considered to have been an interesting time to be alive. But not a good one.