The centre ground alternative that has to be delivered to beat the hard right

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Polly Toynbee had an excellent article in the Guardian yesterday summarising the approach of the Tory far-right and making clear that Brexit is but a step in their plan to turn the UK into an entirely different state from that with which we are familiar where all vestiges of the post-war consensus are swept from view. In response I have done a couple of mind maps, on on the hard right alternative and the other ion what I consider to be the centre ground alternative to which I believe many political parties in the UK could, and I think should, at present subscribe, whilst allowing for differences of emphasis, of course.

This is the hard right alternative:

Click on the image and then click the resulting image to get a large version. Alternatively, this is the text version:

  • The policy platform proposed by the hard right within the Conservative Party
    • Dominic Raab
    • Liz Truss
    • Priti Patel
    • Et al
    • The ‘Britannia Unchained’ Group closely associated with the fundamentalist ‘free enterprise’ Institute for Economic Affairs
  • The principal objectives
    • To deliver unfettered market capitalism to the greatest possible degree
    • To shrink the size of government
    • To remove the social safety net of the welfare state
    • To distribute the return from doing so to those on the highest incomes; those with wealth and to the largest companies
  • The practical consequences
    • Government withdrawal from traditional areas of activity
      • The environment
      • Employee protection including the abolition of the minimum wage, reduced health and safety obligations, reduced employment protection and attacks in the remaining rights of trade unions
      • The protection of minorities and the tackling of discrimination, including on the basis of gender, sexual orientation, faith, race and other issues
      • Overseas aid and development
      • Higher education
      • Significant parts of health supply
      • Pension provision
      • Support for trade and industry
    • Substantial tax reform
      • Reductions in corporate taxation, or its eventual abolition
      • Likely abolition of inheritance tax
      • Significant cuts in or abolition of capital gains tax
      • Flat rate income tax across all income ranges
      • Likely increases in VAT, including its extension to housing, food, health care and education
      • Free movement of capital and migration policies to suit its owners
    • The ending of many benefits
      • Cuts in support for those who are unemployed
      • Continuing reductions in benefits for those with disabilities
      • Reductions in housing support
      • Reductions in the real value of state pensions
      • Increasing obstacles placed in the way of claimants to reduce uptake
    • Reduced transparency
      • Less accountability for government
      • The outsourcing of many services putting them beyond public and political accountability
      • Reduced corporate disclosure requirements
      • An end to Freedom of Information
      • Reduced press regulation to provide freedom to far-right media outlets

And this is the centre ground alternative:

This is the text version of that:

  • The policy that should be promoted by all parties that have the interests of the majority of people in the UK at heart. There should be broad consensus across:
    • Labour
    • The SNP
    • LibDems
    • Plaid
    • Greens
    • SDLP
    • Sinn Fein
    • And some in the Conservative Party
  • The principal objectives
    • To promote a sustainable democracy
    • To protect the environment
    • To deliver long-term employment opportunities
    • To protect the vulnerable in society
    • To maintain a social safety net in a welfare state
  • The practical consequences
    • Government support for
      • Environmental protection
      • A strong, mixed economy in which markets and state each do what they are best at, and work in partnership when appropriate (but not for dogmatic reasons)
      • Employee rights
      • Those who suffer discrimination in all its forms
      • Those who suffer absolute and relative poverty
      • The correction of market failure, including on:
        • Health and safety
        • Exploitative products
        • Monopoly abuse
        • Unfair competition
      • The right to:
        • Housing
        • Childcare
        • Lifelong education to provide skills for life and not just employment
        • Em0loyment
        • Dignity in old age
        • Protection, including from the state and employers
      • New businesses when markets cannot or will not provide access to capital
      • Overseas aid
      • International protection of human rights
      • Peace
      • Controlled migration within an open and accountable policy framework
    • Substantial tax reform
      • The creation of a progressive tax system because reducing income and wealth inequality is the right thing to do for society
      • Increasing tax charges for larger businesses because they are failing to compensate fir the risk they pose to society
      • An environmental focus to taxation to help tackle climate change
    • A commitment to a welfare state
      • The necessary corollary of the noted policy objectives
    • Enhanced accountability
      • Improved government accounting
      • Enhanced disclosure on the control of the tax system with a focus on demonstrating its equity at the broadest possible level
      • Press regulation to uphold freedom of expression and to prevent concentrated control of the media
      • Electoral reform to enhance the democratic accountability of all elected officials and all forms of government
      • Bringing outsourced government service suppliers within the control of accountability

I long for the centre ground to realise that it is in their combined interests to beat the far-right. And now is the time to do it. Then the differences of emphases trhat parties rightly have can be explored. But none are possible if the far-right win.